Top 5 Questionably Luxurious Dining Experiences

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If you want to go to an expensive restaurant for more than just a fancy epicurean experience, an eatery that caters to your other senses (including your sense of humor) may do the trick. The top questionably luxurious dining experiences are those that are among the most unusual and perhaps a bit ridiculous.

5 Hajime Robot Restaurant

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In Thailand, you get the opportunity to have a luxury dining experience without a server. Instead, you get a robot that brings you your food, buses your table or cooks. You order your own food using a touch screen at your table, making the bots kind of like a glorified vending machine. While the robots don’t talk or build a rapport with the diners, they do wear samurai outfits and break into dance periodically. While you may think that the robotic food-serving system may make your meal cheaper since the restaurant has less staff wages to pay, it does not. Then, at the end of the meal, you have the tough choice of deciding how much to tip a robot if the gratuity isn’t already included.

4 Dinner in the Sky

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At Dinner in the Sky, you’re stuck at your table until the conclusion of the meal. With locations across 30 countries, the idea behind the restaurant is to create an unforgettable event. You and up to 21 guests sit down at a table with seats that look like they were designed for roller coasters. A crane then hoists the tables and chairs 50 meters into the sky. The exclusive dining experience has a kitchen set up in the middle of the tables where a chef cooks your meal, and you can even request an additional platform for entertainment. While the idea of eating in the sky is novel, fighting birds for your food, napkins constantly blowing away and a platform that sways with the wind is not.

3 Modern Toilet Restaurant

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There’s a saying that goes, “Don’t (poo) where you eat.” This is very true at the Modern Toilet Restaurant. A franchise with establishments throughout Taiwan, Japan and South Korea, actual (non-functioning) toilets serve as your chairs and a raised bathtub or sink covered with a sheet of glass is your table. Bowls are toilet-shaped, drinks come in urinal-shaped cups and your noodles may come in a bathtub that’s better suited for a child’s doll. If you don’t think that the restaurant seems luxurious, take a look at the prices. A service of ice cream is about $10.

2 Supperclub

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While you can always eat in bed at home, you may not have a server bringing you the meals. With restaurants in Amsterdam, London, Istanbul, Dubai, Los Angeles and San Francisco, Supperclub is an upscale restaurant and dance club. The restaurant’s website shares that the establishment “revolves around stimulating your senses and releasing your creativity.” Instead of eating at a table, you lounge on oversized white beds. While you watch acrobats swing around as the music plays, you can’t help but wonder whose crumbs are in the bed.

1 Dans le Noir

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Dans le Noir is nothing special if you’re blind. It’s like eating at any other expensive restaurant, except that the menu conveniently uses Braille. If you’re blessed with good or corrective eyesight, the dining experience may be frightening. When you enter the restaurant, you have to choose a menu color. Each color represents a different type of food, like seafood or vegetarian. The host then leads you through a pitch black dining room to your table. Unlike other dark restaurants that have staff with night-vision goggles, Dans le Noir hires blind waiters to expertly meet your dining needs. The staff asks you to remain seated while in the restaurant and to speak in hushed tones. If you’re too loud, the maître d’ will let you (passive aggressively) know by ringing a bell. As you eat, you have no idea about how your food looks, the cleanliness of your flatware, where you are or if you’re going to accidentally spill your drink again. You can find Dans le Noir in London, Paris, Barcelona and Saint Petersburg.

Flora Richards-Gustafson has been writing professionally since 2003. She creates copy for websites, marketing materials and printed publications. Richards-Gustafson specializes in SEO and writing about small-business strategies, health and beauty, interior design, emergency preparedness and education. Richards-Gustafson received a Bachelor of Arts from George Fox University in 2003 and was recognized by Cambridge's "Who's Who" in 2009 as a leading woman entrepreneur.

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